Austrian Mountaineering Villages

Ginzling ©alaindevisme/flickr

Ginzling ©alaindevisme/flickr

There are at least seventeen Austrian mountaineering villages with excellent environment quality and great landscape. Even they are committed to the local cultural and natural values preservation. From Jenbach, you can get to the Ginzling im Zillertal which is one of the mountaineering villages. You can take a train there or by bus from Mayrhofen. The other alternative way is by car on the Inntalautobahn A12 motorway. There are lodges such as the Gamshutte, the Friesenberghaus, the Olperer Hutte, the Furtschaglhaus or even the Berliner Hutte. There are different sizes with different number of beds to accommodate even if you are going in groups. Some are domintory places, and the summer times are from the middle of June til early September, depending on the accommodation lodges you choose, some extends til October for the winter.

Grosses Walsertal

There are six villages that forms the Grosses Walsertal Biosphere Reserve. You can get tot he western part of Austria to see this amazing UNESCO cultural landscape. Walser people occupied this place since the 13th century. This place has very high plant and animal diversity. There are karst features as well as gypsum springs. Hence geologically speaking, it is very diverse too. The major ecosystem type here is a mixed of mountain and highland systems. Nature lovers you will ike what the flora and fauna has to offer. This area is very species-rich as you can find the different usage of the land. For example, you can find rich pastures of herbs like the arnica plant even today. It is an old medicinal plant that can heal wounds. Rare nigritella lives in the limestone grasslands as it is the ideal habitats for it. This small reddish-brown orchid has a strong vanilla-like smell. Marmot can be found on the meadows above, you can simply hear the shrill whistles while you are hiking. There are also Alpine toda flax on the calcareous scree floors. Ibexes and chamois can be found on the highest peak in the valley. Rote Wand is a breathtaking peak.

Walser People

Nenzing ©mrkgllsp/flickr

Nenzing ©mrkgllsp/flickr

Walser people has their ancestors from Wallis in Switzerland and they emigrated in the 14th century and settle down here. You can get to the Grosses Walsertal by car exiting Nenzing or Bludenz-West. Alternatively you can get there by international express trains. Some buses and even taxi services at the Feldkirch stations offers their services there too.

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